Each circle represents a 4-credit course to be distributed among the categories of Language, Quantitative Literacy, Writing & Cultures, and the Areas of Inquiry: Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts & Letters and Other. You may edit the names of the categories. Currently the Bachelor of Arts requires 12 credits more than the Bachelor of Sciences—these are represented by the lighter colored circles.

Bachelors of (specify)

Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
Arts & Letters
Language
Quantitative Literacy
Writing & Cultures
Writing 121
Writing 122/123
DIA
GP
Other (specify)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Post your proposed degree.

Drag the circles to the categories and create your own Bachelors degree. Click on “Post your proposed degree” to send your proposed degree to the comments. This will result in some HTML code appearing in the comments text area below. Just hit “Post Comment” and your proposal will appear in the comments!

You may edit the text within each circle, for instance to designate a specific course. This has been done with Writing 121, 122/3 and a course in U.S. Cultures: Difference, Inequality, Agency (DIA) and one in Global Perspectives (GP). These courses are currently considered immutable because their requirements are recently specified by Senate legislation. We have categorized these writing courses and US:DIA, GP under the heading Writing & Cultures to unify and simplify the presentation of requirements to students.

Things to think about when dragging and editing:

  • The total number of credits should be the same between the BA and BS
  • Based on the Rule of Thirds for undergraduate degrees: 1/3 credits for Core Ed, 1/3 for the major and 1/3 for exploration, and the 180 credit requirement for Bachelors degrees, solutions which use fewer of the light gray circles are preferable.
  • Currently courses are allowed to double-dip betwixt Areas of Inquiry and between an Area of Inquiry and US:DIA or GP. Thus it may be possible to satisfy requirements without taking a course for each circle appearing in the diagram.
  • Currently courses which satisfy the BA or BS may not be used simultaneously to satisfy an Area, US:DIA, or GP requirement. We should discuss whether it is preferable, feasible and/or necessary to relax this prohibition.
  • The current requirements for Areas of Inquiry are actually 15 credits per Area—not four courses per Area. This is to ease transferability, and the vast majority of our students meet this requirement by taking four courses.
  • We are rethinking our BA/BS requirements; do not feel constrained by our current requirements when distributing courses.
  • If you have creative ideas about how BA or BS specific courses, sequences or programs should work, please email me.

Current Category Descriptions

Areas of Inquiry

Natural Sciences

Outcomes

As a result of taking General Education Science courses, a student should be able to:

  • Gather, comprehend, and communicate scientific and technical information in order to explore ideas, models, and solutions and generate further questions;
  • Apply scientific and technical modes of inquiry, individually, and collaboratively, to critically evaluate existing or alternative explanations, solve problems, and make evidence-based decisions in an ethical manner; and
  • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies and critically examine the influence of scientific and technical knowledge on human society and the environment.
Criteria
  1. A General Education course in either Science should:
    1. Analyze the development, scope, and limitations of fundamental scientific concepts, models, theories, and methods.
    2. Engage students in problem-solving and investigation, through the application of scientific and mathematical methods and concepts, and by using evidence to create and test models and draw conclusions. The goal should be to develop analytical thinking that includes evaluation, synthesis, and creative insight.
    3. Examine relationships with other subject areas, including the ethical application of science in human society and the relevance of science to everyday life.

In addition, a General Education course in Science should:
Engage students in collaborative, hands-on and/or real-life activities that develop scientific reasoning and the capacity to apply mathematics and that allow students to experience the exhilaration of discovery.

Social Sciences

Outcomes

As a result of taking General Education Social Science courses, a student should be able to:

  • Apply analytical skills to social phenomena in order to understand human behavior; and
  • Apply knowledge and experience to foster personal growth and better appreciate the diverse social world in which we live.
Criteria
  1. An introductory course in the Social Sciences should be broad in scope. Courses may focus on specialized or interdisciplinary subjects, but there must be substantial course content locating the subject in the broader context of the discipline(s). Approved courses will help students to:
    1. Understand the role of individuals and institutions within the context of society.
    2. Assess different theories and concepts and understand the distinctions between empirical and other methods of inquiry.
    3. Utilize appropriate information literacy skills in written and oral communication.
    4. Understand the diversity of human experience and thought, individually and collectively.
    5. Apply knowledge and skills to contemporary problems and issues.

Arts & Letters

Outcomes

As a result of taking General Education Arts & Letters* courses, a student should be able to:

  • Interpret and engage in the Arts & Letters, making use of the creative process to enrich the quality of life; and
  • Critically analyze values and ethics within a range of human experience and expression to engage more fully in local and global issues.

* “Arts & Letters” refers to works of art, whether written, crafted, designed, or performed anddocuments of historical or cultural significance.

Criteria
  1. A course in Arts & Letters should:
    1. Introduce the fundamental ideas and practices of the discipline and allow students to apply them.
    2. Elicit analytical and critical responses to historical and/or cultural works, such as literature, music, language, philosophy, religion, and the visual and performing arts.
    3. Explore the conventions and techniques of significant forms of human expression.
    4. Place the discipline in a historical and cultural context and demonstrate its relationship with other discipline.
    5. Each course should also do at least one of the following:
      • Foster creative individual expression via analysis, synthesis, and critical evaluation;
      • Compare/contrast attitudes and values of specific historical periods or world cultures; and
      • Examine the origins and influences of ethical or aesthetic traditions.

Writing & Cultures

Writing

Outcomes

As a result of completing the General Education Writing sequence, a student should be able to:

  • Read actively, think critically, and write purposefully and capably for academic and, in some cases, professional audiences;
  • Locate, evaluate, and ethically utilize information to communicate effectively; and
  • Demonstrate appropriate reasoning in response to complex issues.
Criteria
  1. A course in Writing should:
    1. Create a learning environment that fosters respectful and free exchange of ideas.
    2. Include college-level readings that challenge students and require the analysis of complex ideas.
    3. Provide guided discussion and model practices that help students listen to, reflect upon, and respond to others’ ideas.
    4. Foster students’ ability to summarize and respond in writing to ideas generated by reading and discussion.
    5. Require a substantial amount of formal and informal writing.
    6. Emphasize writing as a recursive process of productive revision that results in complete, polished texts appropriate to audience needs and rhetorical situations.
    7. Foreground the importance of focus, organization, and logical development of written work.
    8. Guide students to reflect on their own writing, to provide feedback on peers’ drafts, and to respond to peer and instructor comments.
    9. Direct students to craft clear sentences and to recognize and apply the conventions ofEdited Standard Written English.
    10. Provide students with practice summarizing, paraphrasing, analyzing, synthesizing, and citing sources using a conventional documentation system.
    11. Require appropriate technologies in the service of writing and learning.

U.S.: Difference, Inequality, Agency

Courses in the US: Difference, Inequality, Agency category will develop students’ analytical and reflective capacities to help them understand and ethically engage with the ongoing (cultural, economic, political, social, etc.) power imbalances that have shaped and continue to shape the United States. This engagement may also include the relation of the United States to other regions of the world. Each course will include scholarship, cultural production, perspectives, and voices from members of communities historically marginalized by these legacies of inequality.

Each course will undertake one or more of the following:

  • Teach respectful listening and tools for ethical dialogue in order to expand students’ abilities to practice civil conversation and engage with deeply felt or controversial issues.
  • Facilitate student reflection on their own multiple social identifications and on how those identifications are formed and located in relation to power.

Each course will address:

  • Intersecting aspects of identity such as race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, indigeneity, national origin, religion, or ability.
  • The uses of power to classify, rank, and marginalize on the basis of these aspects of identity, as well as considerations of agency on the part of marginalized groups.
  • Historical structures, contemporary structures, forms of knowledge, cultural practices, or ideologies that perpetuate or change the distribution of power in society.

Global Perspectives

Courses in the Global Perspectives category will foster student encounter with and critical reflection upon cultures, identities, and ways of being in global contexts. Each course will include substantial scholarship, cultural production, perspectives, and voices from members of communities under study, as sources permit.

Each course will undertake one or more of the following:

  • Teach respectful listening and civil conversation as critical tools for collective student engagement with topics that are controversial today;
  • Provide critical vocabulary and concepts allowing students to engage and discuss topics with which students may be unfamiliar.

Each course will engage with one of more of the following:

  • Texts, literature, art, testimonies, practices, or other cultural products that reflect systems of meaning or beliefs beyond the US context;
  • Power relations involving different nations, peoples and identity groups, or world regions;
  • Consideration of hierarchy, marginality or discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, nationality, or ability (or some combination).

Approved study abroad programs also fulfill the Global Perspectives requirement.

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2 thoughts on “BA/BS Modeling

  1. Current Bachelors of Science

    Natural Sciences
     
     
     
     
     
    Social Sciences
     
     
     
     
    Arts & Letters
     
     
     
     
    Language
    Math or CIS
     
     
     
    Writing & Cultures
    Writing 121
    Writing 122/123
    DIA
    GP
    Other (specify)
     
     
     
    1+
  2. Current Bachelors of Arts

    Natural Sciences
     
     
     
     
     
    Social Sciences
     
     
     
     
    Arts & Letters
     
     
     
     
    Language
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Quantitative Literacy
    Writing & Cultures
    Writing 121
    Writing 122/123
    DIA
    GP
    Other (specify)
    1+

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